Readers' Submissions

Off The Beaten Track in Bangkok: Part Three – The Golden Temple and Beyond

  • Written by Mega
  • November 1st, 2012
  • 14 min read



Golden Mount Bangkok


If you are a resident of Bangkok as I am, a trip to one of the temples in this teeming metropolis is not something which often inspires enthusiasm; even less so if the intended day’s destination is well beyond the limits of the skytrain or underground networks. I’d been considering a trip to Wat Saket for quite a while; particularly so as its position atop a small hill affords nice views of the surrounds of Bangkok. After checking Google Maps and finding that getting there would involve a lengthy taxi ride my eagerness was tempered somewhat until someone mentioned that I could try using the ages old Bangkok water taxis. Another close inspection of Google Maps revealed there was a klong (canal), with a water taxi jetty, within a few minutes walk of my apartment. After sounding out Stick about the possibility of joining me for the day’s outing, a plan was hatched whereby we would visit the temple on the Golden Mount, have lunch at a nearby restaurant and then walk into Chinatown before catching the MRT (the underground rail system) back to our mid-Sukhumvit residences.

The day arrived and, armed with our cameras, we made our way to the Saen Saep jetty; just a few minutes walk from Petchaburi station. I was looking forward to the ride up the klong because, as strange as it may be, in the 18 years that I’d resided in Thailand I’d never done the water taxi up the klong thing. The recent rain of the past few days had cleared to reveal partly cloudy skies and a penetrating sun above. At 11 AM the humidity was already thick in the air but the roof, jutting out over the jetty, provided a measure of relief as I stood there dripping in perspiration. Within a couple of minutes the bow of a narrow, wooden vessel hove into sight and, in double quick time, we were scrambling aboard with the rest of the waiting crowd. A word of warning if you are planning to take a ride on a Bangkok water taxi; the drivers and boat crew don’t dally about when it comes to pulling up at one of the river jetties. The time between stopping and continuing on is barely 30 seconds. Most of the locals understand this as they quickly board and jostle for the few seats available; their smaller statures enabling them to easily duck under the low hanging framework and protective canvas cover as we contorted our larger frames into the limited standing space left available.

We missed out on seating but no matter, we were there to take photos so a spot leaning against the side of the vessel was probably the better option. As the driver hit the throttle and we accelerated away from the jetty, Stick, with his fluent command of the Thai language was able to get some useful information from one of the boat staff as she came by collecting the fares. Our journey would terminate at a jetty quite near to Wat Saket. It was an approximately 25-minute ride and would involve a change over at the mid-point. As I handed over my 14 baht for the trip I had to admit that when compared with the cost of a long taxi ride, it was definitely good value.


Golden Mount Bangkok

Gunning it up the klong to Wat Saket


As the driver gunned it down the klong the boat crew worked their way nimbly along the gunwale raising a blue tarpaulin to keep the fine spray, being thrown up from the bow, from drenching the passengers. The young lady collecting the fares was rather cute. I tried asking a for a photo but she waved me off and quickly turned her head away. Stick, being a bit of a sleuth when it comes to getting unsolicited candid photos, had more success and managed to bag some nice shots using his larger telephoto lens. Approximately 15 minutes after our initial departure we were transferring on to another water taxi for the final part of our ride. As the locals jostled for the limited seating available we settled in with cameras at the ready along the gunwale once more.

Golden Mount Bangkok

The changeover at the mid-point of the run up the klong


An interesting aspect of the trip and one that presents a myriad of photo opportunities is the way in which the city crowds right up to the water's edge. Ramshackle little shophouses with their inhabitants can be seen overhanging the walled borders of the river. Tucked away in their little backwater byways life goes on uninterrupted, as it has no doubt for decades past for the locals as they work, eat, and play along the klong. Finally we arrive at our last stop and as we disembark onto the jetty, the upper reaches of Wat Saket can been seen nearby. Stick seems to know where he’s going and as we begin making our way across the bridge towards the entrance of the Golden Temple, an enthusiastic tuktuk driver chases after us to tell us “the big Buddha this way, the big Buddha this way,” as he points in the opposite direction we are going.



Golden Mount Bangkok

The lower reaches of the stairway to the top


We both had a bit of a laugh and as we continue on toward Wat Saket I make the remark that “perhaps he might know of some gem sellers who have the once yearly special prices just for today.” A couple of minutes later Stick was leading me through the entrance to the temple.

The Golden Mount sits at the summit of a small knoll which is within the grounds of a supporting complex. The gardens on the lower reaches were quite idyllic and presented more photo opportunities before beginning our ascent up the stairway. The shade provided by the tree canopy as we began our climb up was a welcome respite from the midday heat. According to previous information I’d gleaned about the site, there were 300 steps to negotiate before arriving at the summit. This may sound like a long climb but it’s actually fairly easy going due to the fact that the ascent winds it way around the mount on a gradual incline. Approximately halfway to the top the stairway leveled out to reveal a wider landing with the standard line-up of temple bells. After a time out for more photos we were on our way again up the final stretch to the top. The distance back to ground level is probably no more than fifty meters straight down but having said that, it’s still high enough to provide some nice views of the expanse of Krung Thep. As we were banging off a few panoramic shots of the city spread out beyond, three lovely university lasses came ambling up the stairway. One – the slimmest of the group – was quite photogenic and as some of the following shots attest, this turn of events proved to be rather fortuitous photo wise.


Golden Mount Bangkok

Half way to the top; the standard line up of temple bells



Golden Mount Bangkok

The view towards downtown Krung Thep


Golden Mount Bangkok

The bottom level with the inner sanctum beyond


The pretties gave us perfunctory smiles in passing, and a couple of minutes later we made our way up the final few steps to the lower level of the temple on the mount. The temple has two levels; an enclosed lower level with a line-up of Buddha statues and the roof top level with its impressive golden spire. At the center of the lower level is what might be described as the inner sanctum or the holiest of holy. As we progressed around the interior of the lower level a number of Thais were lined up waiting for their turn to go into narrow inner sanctum enclave and pay homage to a golden spire within. After getting a few more shots we continued on as Stick lead the way up a narrow stairway to the temple roof. The midday sun was fairly intense as we emerged onto the rooftop but, as hot as it may have been, I had to admit that the golden spire was quite an impressive sight and well worth the journey to get there. Besides the contingent of tourists milling about taking holiday snaps there were also quite a few locals paying homage to the holy site. The three university lasses were in quite a devout mood as they began a kneeling ritual in front of one of the smaller spires. I decided that it was a photo opportunity not to be missed and said as much to Stick who informed me that “taking a photo from behind may be okay but they might consider a camera pushed in their faces while doing their three bows to be a bit offensive.” I guess I will be consigned to the ranks of a heathen for disregarding his advice. After about 45 minutes of banging off shots from all different angles we decided to move on to Democracy Monument for some air-conditioned comfort and a Thai food lunch.



Golden Mount Bangkok

Preparing for their three wais



Golden Mount Bangkok

Doing the standard three circumnavigations of the temple spire

Golden Mount Bangkok

The impressive golden spire on the roof of Wat Saket


Golden Mount Bangkok

A Thai lad paying homage to a holy edifice


As luck would have it, the pretties decided to take their leave at the same time and as we were leaving the lower level of the temple, Stick managed to get some nice shots as they were leaning through one of the windows; their less than friendly looks as we departed down the stairs also consigning him to the ranks of a heathen.

The walk down to Democracy Monument also offered plenty of interesting photo opportunities. The road which parallels Wat Saket seems to specialise in wood products with timber merchants, wood joiners and tourist knick knack shops in abundance. With Stick seeming to know the route to take we were soon turning onto the wide road that leads down to Democracy Monument. At the point we entered there was a major intersection which appeared to be dedicated to HRH the Queen. There were some large posters/paintings of her royal personage looking out over the roadway and a closer inspection of the area revealed an art gallery dedicated in her name as well. The wide tree-lined footpath made for easy walking as we approached the four curved sentinels at the cross roads of what is known as Democracy Monument. Our chosen venue for lunch, the Sorn Daeng Restaurant, is, according to Stick, a well-known eating establishment amongst the hi-so fraternity of Bangkok. We entered and were shown to a table by waiters wearing white, high-collared military-style jackets. I thought it was rather ironic; just a few meters back down the road there was a group of ragged looking derelicts out of it on the street.


Golden Mount Bangkok

Low-so



Golden Mount Bangkok

And just around the corner; hi-so




Golden Mount Bangkok

Fine dining at the Sorn Daeng Restaurant


The food is reasonably priced and of an excellent standard. As we sat there chomping through our orders of chicken and cashew nuts, salty fish and kale along with fried vegetables with beef, the window seat we’d chosen gave us a nice view across the intersection to Democracy Monument. The Mercs parked along the curbside no doubt belonged to the local hi-so crew who were also filling up on their favourite lunch time cuisine. As a female singer accompanied by a pianist warbled post world war two classics in the background I couldn’t helping thinking that there’s something rather odd, even peculiar, about these Thai hi-sos. In fact it has to be said some of them don’t even look Thai. With their pale skin and European facial features, one might be forgiven for thinking that they were from anywhere else but Thailand. Their attire is odd as well. I mean, who wears velvet dinner jackets and cravats to lunch? Obviously people in a world that I have no inkling of. I’m quite sure that the wealthy of this country live in some kind of bubble or time warp, where the deprivations of the people on the street pushing around chuck wagons are barely known or recognised. As their wine glasses were filled again by the hovering white jacketed attendees, the term “let them eat cake” sprung to mind. With an excellent meal under our belts it was time to continue our walk through the by-ways to Yaowarat. Stick mentioned something about a big loop which would take in the grand Palace, Wat Po then skirt the edge of the flower market before the final stretch down to Chinatown. To be honest, being unfamiliar with this part of Bangkok, I didn’t have a clue where we were heading. Fortunately Stick was well versed with the route we were taking and it wasn't long before meandering down a street that seemed to be entirely dedicated to Buddha images.


Golden Mount Bangkok


The street of Buddhas was lined with a myriad of shophouses, on either side, packed with images and golden statues. As we worked our way along we could see the roofing of the Grand Palace and its perimeter wall drawing closer in the distance. Some of the shops had strange looking effigies and one in particular was home to three incredibly life-like wax monks. As we stopped to have a closer look at them, Stick recounted an amusing anecdote about a friend of his who, upon setting eyes on the three life like figures ran off into the night. As we stood there taking photos I could understand why his friend got spooked; the mannequins were so detailed one could be forgiven for thinking they were real people. With the perspiration dripping off us due to the high humidity in the mid afternoon, we eventually arrived at the intersection of the street of Buddhas and the road that parallels the Grand Palace's perimeter wall. As we took some shade under trees adorning a lawned area, the building on the opposite corner caught my attention. With its olden times ships canons placed in amongst the surrounding hedgerows, and its columned architecture fronting the building, there was definitely a Lilliputian look about the place. Stick was quick to inform me that it was the Defence Ministry building. I had a bit a quiet laugh to myself. It fitted the bill. We are, after all, in the land of make believe. After rehydrating with some much needed cold water, it was time to hit the road again. Stick's estimate of the time it would take to arrive at Hualumpong Station was roughly another hour or so.


Golden Mount Bangkok

Life-like wax monks




Golden Mount Bangkok

The Defence Ministry building




Golden Mount Bangkok

The quieter lanes of Wat Po



Golden Mount Bangkok

The hustle and bustle of Chinatown



Golden Mount Bangkok

Another good reason for heading to Chinatown; fresh pomegranate juice




Golden Mount Bangkok

The sleeping Buddha?


We still had some ground to cover before arriving at our final destination. Thankfully a blanket of cloud had rolled in and give us a bit of respite from the intense mid-afternoon heat as we worked our way down Thanon Rachadamnoen Nai. The wall of the Grand Palace faded behind us to be replaced by the Wat Po complex to our right and a line up of government buildings to our left. The relatively uncrowded stretch that borders Wat Po and the government buildings eventually gave way to the congestion of the small sois around the flower market area. We dodged and weaved our way in-between the food hawkers carts, vendors stalls and tuktuks, before eventually turning left into Thanon Pahurat. It was a good thing that Stick knew the way because without him I would’ve been completely lost in the mayhem of the crowded footpaths and laneways. Twenty minutes later the familiar sight of the area known as “Little India” hove into view and I knew we didn’t have much further to go. The crowded sidewalks of Yaowarat reduced our clip to an amble and even though the throngs can be a bit annoying at times there are some things about being there that we both enjoy; fresh pomegranate juice being one of them. Our last photo stop, before arriving at Hualumpong Station, was Wat Traimit where a monk, dozing in a seated position, proved to be an amusing distraction for quite a few sightseers with cameras. By the time we arrived at the MRT station I was feeling a bit zapped from the heat and despite the fact that we’d covered the best part of six kilometers through the streets of Bangkok, in under two hours, it had been another great day out. Thanks, Stick.


Safe Travels,

Mega



Stickman's thoughts:

It was just another excellent day out. Looking forward to a few more in December!